Be on schedule.Score better.

support@savemydegree.com

EN

Our Services

Get 15% Discount on your First Order

Case 1 Review the pharyngitis scenarios and determine the

Case 1 

Review the pharyngitis scenarios and determine the most likely cause, including pathogen and mode of transmission. Discuss data that support your decision and treatment strategies. 

Scenario 1:  Susan is a 16-year-old with sudden onset of severe sore throat for the past day. She feels like she had a fever but did not check her temperature (i.e., subjective fever). She states it is very painful to swallow, and she thinks she sees white spots on her throat. She denies cough, rhinorrhea, nausea, otalgia, shortness of breath, or headache. She reports no exposure to sick individuals. 

  • Medications: none.
  • Allergies: none.
  • Social history: nonsmoker and drinks alcohol (two to three beers) one to two times a month.
  • Physical examination: vital signs – temperature 101.0°F; pulse 100 beats per minute; respirations 18 per minute; blood pressure 110/66 mmHg.
  • General: ill and tired appearance.
  • Head, Eyes, Ears, Nose, and Throat: unremarkable except for erythematous oropharynx with small petechiae and white tonsillar exudates.
  • Neck: anterior cervical lymphadenopathy; two on right, three on left; all small (< 0.5 cm) and tender.
  • Cardiovascular, Lungs, and Abdomen: unremarkable.

Answer the following questions or provide responses based on this scenario. 

  1. What is the most likely diagnosis and pathogen causing this disorder and mode of transmission?
  2. Discuss data that supports your decision.
  3. What diagnostic test, if any, should be done?
  4. Develop a treatment plan for this patient.

Scenario 2: Mr. Jones is a 54-year-old man with complaints of a scratchy, raw sore throat and painful swallowing, mild productive cough, and runny nose for the past 2 days. He says his sputum is whitish-yellow. His ears feel full, and he feels like he is getting achy. He reports taking throat lozenges and denies nausea, fever, shortness of breath, chest pain, or headache. He states he teaches in a high school and a lot of his students have had colds. 

  • Medications: none.
  • Allergies: none.
  • Social history: nonsmoker and does not drink alcohol.
  • Physical examination: vital signs – temperature 99.0°F; pulse 84 beats per minute; respirations 18 per minute; blood pressure 120/70 mmHg.
  • General: cough during exam.
  • HEENT: unremarkable except for mild erythematous oropharynx with no exudates; nares with mild erythema and scant yellowish discharge.
  • Neck, CV, Lungs, Abdomen: unremarkable.

Answer the following questions or provide responses based on this scenario. 

  1. What is the most likely diagnosis and pathogen causing this disorder and mode of transmission?
  2. Discuss data that support your decision.
  3. What diagnostic test, if any, should be done?
  4. Develop a treatment plan for this patient.
  5. Compare the causes, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of pharyngitis in these two cases.

Case 2

Review the pulmonary infection scenarios and discuss whether the diagnosis is infectious rhinitis, influenza, acute bronchitis, acute bronchiolitis, or pneumonia. Discuss the most common pathogen and mode of transmission Discuss data that support your decision and treatment strategies. 

Scenarios 1: Jack is a 21-year-old complaining of a sudden onset of myalgia with his body aching all over and headache for the past day. He feels tired and has the chills, and his temperature was 100°F. He has a mild nonproductive cough. He denies rhinorrhea, sinus pain, nausea, otalgia, or shortness of breath. He reports exposure to sick contacts in his dorm, stating, “Everyone seems to be coughing and catching a cold or the flu.” 

  • Medications: none.
  • Allergies: penicillin.
  • Past medical history: healthy.
  • Social history: college student, lives in a dormitory. Nonsmoker and drinks alcohol once a week, about two or three beers.
  • Physical examination: vital signs – temperature 100°F; pulse 98 beats per minute; respiratorations18 per minute; blood pressure 110/70 mmHg; pulse oximeter 98%.
  • General: ill and tired appearance.
  • Head, Eyes, Ears, Neck, Throat: unremarkable.
  • Neck: no lymphadenopathy; negative Kernig sign, negative Brudzinski sign.
  • Cardiovascular lungs, abdomen: unremarkable.

Answer the following questions or provide responses based on this scenario. 

  1. What is the most likely diagnosis and pathogen causing this disorder?
  2. Discuss the mode of transmission and discuss the data that supports your decision.
  3. What diagnostic test, if any, should be done?
  4. Develop a treatment plan for this patient.

 Scenarios 2: Mr. Menendez is a 65-year-old man presenting with 2–3 days of coughing up thick yellow sputum, shortness of , and fever (he did not check the actual temperature), and chills. He states his chest hurts when he breathes. He denies headache, rhinorrhea, sinus pain, and nausea. He reports no exposure to sick individuals. 

  • Medications: lisinopril 10 mg a day by mouth.
  • Allergies: no known drug allergy.
  • Social history: smokes 1 pack of cigarettes per day (has done so for 30 years); denies alcohol use; works as a landscaper.
  • Physical examination: vital signs – temperature 101°F; pulse 98 beats per minute; respirations 22 per minute; blood pressure 140/86 mmHg; pulse oximeter 93%.
  • General: ill and tired appearance, coughing during visit with thick yellow sputum noted.
  • HEENT: unremarkable.
  • Neck: small anterior and posterior cervical nodes.
  • CV: unremarkable.
  • Lungs: right basilar crackles with dullness to percussion in right lower lobe.
  • Abdomen: unremarkable.

Answer the following questions or provide responses based on this scenario. 

  1. What is the most likely diagnosis and pathogen causing this disorder?
  2. Discuss the mode of transmission. Discuss the data that support your decision.
  3. What diagnostic test, if any, should be done?
  4. Develop a treatment plan for this patient.

 Case 3

Jamie is a 1-year-old girl who is coughing and has had rhinorrhea with yellowish discharge for the past day. Her father says today he felt like she had a fever and has not been eating or playing; she has been mostly sleeping. Her 5-year-old sibling has had a cold for a week. 

  • Medications: none.
  • Allergies: no known drug allergies.
  • Vaccinations: up to date for age.
  • Social history: in day care; lives with mother, father, and 5-year-old sibling.
  • Physical examination: vital signs – temperature 101.5°F; pulse 120 beats per minute; respirations 34 per minute; blood pressure 100/60 mmHg; pulse oximeter 92%.
  • General: sitting in father’s lap; ill, lethargic appearance, and coughing.
  • HEENT: nasal flaring, nasal mucus yellowish bilaterally; oropharynx with mild erythema.
  • Neck: small anterior and posterior cervical nodes.
  • CV: unremarkable.
  • Lungs: intercostal retractions, expiratory wheezing.
  • Abdomen: unremarkable.

Answer the following questions or provide responses based on this scenario. 

  1. What is the most likely diagnosis and pathogen causing this disorder? Discuss the mode of transmission and discuss data that supports your decision.
  2. What diagnostic test, if any, should be done?
  3. Develop a treatment plan for this patient.
  4. Professional Reflection on the 3 cases. Citations and references.

You are a medical professor in charge of creating college assignments and answers for medical college students. You design and conduct lectures, evaluate student performance and provide feedback through examinations and assignments. Answer each question separately. Include and Introduction. Provide an answer to this content

Case 1 

Review the pharyngitis scenarios and determine the most likely cause, including pathogen and mode of transmission. Discuss data that support your decision and treatment strategies. 

Scenario 1:  Susan is a 16-year-old with sudden onset of severe sore throat for the past day. She feels like she had a fever but did not check her temperature (i.e., subjective fever). She states it is very painful to swallow, and she thinks she sees white spots on her throat. She denies cough, rhinorrhea, nausea, otalgia, shortness of breath, or headache. She reports no exposure to sick individuals. 

  • Medications: none.
  • Allergies: none.
  • Social history: nonsmoker and drinks alcohol (two to three beers) one to two times a month.
  • Physical examination: vital signs – temperature 101.0°F; pulse 100 beats per minute; respirations 18 per minute; blood pressure 110/66 mmHg.
  • General: ill and tired appearance.
  • Head, Eyes, Ears, Nose, and Throat: unremarkable except for erythematous oropharynx with small petechiae and white tonsillar exudates.
  • Neck: anterior cervical lymphadenopathy; two on right, three on left; all small (< 0.5 cm) and tender.
  • Cardiovascular, Lungs, and Abdomen: unremarkable.

Answer the following questions or provide responses based on this scenario. 

  1. What is the most likely diagnosis and pathogen causing this disorder and mode of transmission?
  2. Discuss data that supports your decision.
  3. What diagnostic test, if any, should be done?
  4. Develop a treatment plan for this patient.

Scenario 2: Mr. Jones is a 54-year-old man with complaints of a scratchy, raw sore throat and painful swallowing, mild productive cough, and runny nose for the past 2 days. He says his sputum is whitish-yellow. His ears feel full, and he feels like he is getting achy. He reports taking throat lozenges and denies nausea, fever, shortness of breath, chest pain, or headache. He states he teaches in a high school and a lot of his students have had colds. 

  • Medications: none.
  • Allergies: none.
  • Social history: nonsmoker and does not drink alcohol.
  • Physical examination: vital signs – temperature 99.0°F; pulse 84 beats per minute; respirations 18 per minute; blood pressure 120/70 mmHg.
  • General: cough during exam.
  • HEENT: unremarkable except for mild erythematous oropharynx with no exudates; nares with mild erythema and scant yellowish discharge.
  • Neck, CV, Lungs, Abdomen: unremarkable.

Answer the following questions or provide responses based on this scenario. 

  1. What is the most likely diagnosis and pathogen causing this disorder and mode of transmission?
  2. Discuss data that support your decision.
  3. What diagnostic test, if any, should be done?
  4. Develop a treatment plan for this patient.
  5. Compare the causes, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of pharyngitis in these two cases.

Case 2

Review the pulmonary infection scenarios and discuss whether the diagnosis is infectious rhinitis, influenza, acute bronchitis, acute bronchiolitis, or pneumonia. Discuss the most common pathogen and mode of transmission Discuss data that support your decision and treatment strategies. 

Scenarios 1: Jack is a 21-year-old complaining of a sudden onset of myalgia with his body aching all over and headache for the past day. He feels tired and has the chills, and his temperature was 100°F. He has a mild nonproductive cough. He denies rhinorrhea, sinus pain, nausea, otalgia, or shortness of breath. He reports exposure to sick contacts in his dorm, stating, “Everyone seems to be coughing and catching a cold or the flu.” 

  • Medications: none.
  • Allergies: penicillin.
  • Past medical history: healthy.
  • Social history: college student, lives in a dormitory. Nonsmoker and drinks alcohol once a week, about two or three beers.
  • Physical examination: vital signs – temperature 100°F; pulse 98 beats per minute; respiratorations18 per minute; blood pressure 110/70 mmHg; pulse oximeter 98%.
  • General: ill and tired appearance.
  • Head, Eyes, Ears, Neck, Throat: unremarkable.
  • Neck: no lymphadenopathy; negative Kernig sign, negative Brudzinski sign.
  • Cardiovascular lungs, abdomen: unremarkable.

Answer the following questions or provide responses based on this scenario. 

  1. What is the most likely diagnosis and pathogen causing this disorder?
  2. Discuss the mode of transmission and discuss the data that supports your decision.
  3. What diagnostic test, if any, should be done?
  4. Develop a treatment plan for this patient.

 Scenarios 2: Mr. Menendez is a 65-year-old man presenting with 2–3 days of coughing up thick yellow sputum, shortness of , and fever (he did not check the actual temperature), and chills. He states his chest hurts when he breathes. He denies headache, rhinorrhea, sinus pain, and nausea. He reports no exposure to sick individuals. 

  • Medications: lisinopril 10 mg a day by mouth.
  • Allergies: no known drug allergy.
  • Social history: smokes 1 pack of cigarettes per day (has done so for 30 years); denies alcohol use; works as a landscaper.
  • Physical examination: vital signs – temperature 101°F; pulse 98 beats per minute; respirations 22 per minute; blood pressure 140/86 mmHg; pulse oximeter 93%.
  • General: ill and tired appearance, coughing during visit with thick yellow sputum noted.
  • HEENT: unremarkable.
  • Neck: small anterior and posterior cervical nodes.
  • CV: unremarkable.
  • Lungs: right basilar crackles with dullness to percussion in right lower lobe.
  • Abdomen: unremarkable.

Answer the following questions or provide responses based on this scenario. 

  1. What is the most likely diagnosis and pathogen causing this disorder?
  2. Discuss the mode of transmission. Discuss the data that support your decision.
  3. What diagnostic test, if any, should be done?
  4. Develop a treatment plan for this patient.

 Case 3

Jamie is a 1-year-old girl who is coughing and has had rhinorrhea with yellowish discharge for the past day. Her father says today he felt like she had a fever and has not been eating or playing; she has been mostly sleeping. Her 5-year-old sibling has had a cold for a week. 

  • Medications: none.
  • Allergies: no known drug allergies.
  • Vaccinations: up to date for age.
  • Social history: in day care; lives with mother, father, and 5-year-old sibling.
  • Physical examination: vital signs – temperature 101.5°F; pulse 120 beats per minute; respirations 34 per minute; blood pressure 100/60 mmHg; pulse oximeter 92%.
  • General: sitting in father’s lap; ill, lethargic appearance, and coughing.
  • HEENT: nasal flaring, nasal mucus yellowish bilaterally; oropharynx with mild erythema.
  • Neck: small anterior and posterior cervical nodes.
  • CV: unremarkable.
  • Lungs: intercostal retractions, expiratory wheezing.
  • Abdomen: unremarkable.

Answer the following questions or provide responses based on this scenario. 

  1. What is the most likely diagnosis and pathogen causing this disorder? Discuss the mode of transmission and discuss data that supports your decision.
  2. What diagnostic test, if any, should be done?
  3. Develop a treatment plan for this patient.
  4. Professional Reflection on the 3 cases. Citations and references.

. Do not write who you are in the answer.

Share This Post

Email
WhatsApp
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Pinterest
Reddit

Order a Similar Paper and get 15% Discount on your First Order

Related Questions

Trevino, A. J. (2021). Investigating Social Problems.

Trevino, A. J. (2021). Investigating Social Problems. Available from: VitalSourceBookshelf, (3rd Edition). SAGE Publications, Inc  This is the book Please respond to the following prompt. Grammar and spelling count. Draw upon the textbook and lecture notes in your response. What troubling social condition are you most concerned with (that may

Overview In this module, you learned how to monitor key

Overview In this module, you learned how to monitor key performance indicators (KPIs) and boost revenue-cycle management in healthcare organizations. You also explored how data analytics can be leveraged to maintain a robust revenue cycle. In this assignment, you will determine how KPIs support the strategic planning and financial performance

As a new division manager in a health care organization, you

As a new division manager in a health care organization, you have been given an opportunity to attend a lobbying workshop in Washington, D.C. Before attending the workshop, you must research current health care legislation. In preparation, it is important that you use your influencing skills and demonstrate an understanding of the health care policy

Assignment 1: Understanding the Canadian Healthcare System

Assignment 1: Understanding the Canadian Healthcare System Objective: The primary objective of this assignment is to conduct thorough research on the   structure and components of the Canadian healthcare system. Students are expected to gain   insights into its organization, funding mechanisms, and key challenges and achievements, with a  

Recommend one FDA-approved drug, one off-label drug, and one

Recommend one FDA-approved drug, one off-label drug, and one nonpharmacological intervention for treating neuro cognitive disorder in pregnant women. Explain the risk assessment you would use to inform your treatment decision  making. What are the risks and benefits of the FDA-approved medicine? What are the risks and benefits of the

design a method of communicating age appropriate screening

The purpose of this Assignment is for you to design a method of communicating age appropriate screening guidelines to the appropriate population. This can either be a trifold brochure or a 10 slide PowerPoint presentation. Directions 1. Select a screening test and the age appropriate population at risk. 2. Introduce