signs due to patient noncompliance.

Tea, and carbonated drinks.
June 19, 2019
expectations for successful completion.
June 19, 2019

Week 10

To prepare:

  • Review “Genitourinary Disorders” in the Burns et al. text.
  • Review and select one of the three provided case studies. Analyze the patient information.
  • Consider a differential diagnosis for the patient in the case study you selected. Think about the most likely diagnosis for the patient.
  • Think about a treatment and management plan for the patient. Be sure to consider appropriate dosages for any recommended pharmacologic and/or non-pharmacologic treatments.
  • Consider strategies for educating patients and families on the treatment and management of the genitourinary disorder.

By Day 3

Post an explanation of the differential diagnosis for the patient in the case study you selected. Explain which is the most likely diagnosis for the patient and why. Include an explanation of unique characteristics of the disorder you identified as the primary diagnosis. Then, explain a treatment and management plan for the patient, including appropriate dosages for any recommended treatments. Finally, explain strategies for educating patients and families on the treatment and management of the genitourinary disorder.

Case Study 1

You see a 3-year-old with a 2-day history of complaints of dysuria with frequent episodes of enuresis despite potty training about 7 months ago. She is afebrile and denies vomiting. Physical examination is normal. Dipstick voided urine analysis reveals: specific gravity 1.015, Protein 1+ non-hemolyzed blood, 1+ nitrites, 1+ leukocytes, and glucose-negative.

Case Study 2

Mark is a 15-year-old with complaint of acute left scrotal pain with nausea. The pain began approximately 6 hours ago as a dull ache and has gradually worsened to where he can no longer stand without doubling over. He is afebrile and in marked pain. Physical exam is negative except for elevation of the left testicle, diffuse scrotal edema, and the presence of a blue dot sign.

Case Study 3

Maya is a 5-year-old who presents for a well-child visit. She is a healthy child with no complaints. Physical examination is normal. Routine urinalysis indicates 2+ proteinuria; specific gravity 1.020; negative for glucose, blood, leukocytes, and nitrites. Her blood pressure is normal, and she is at the 60th percentile for height and weight.

________________________________________________________________________________________

Week 11

To prepare:

  • Review “Neurologic Disorders” and “Musculoskeletal Disorders” in the Burns et al. text.
  • Review and select one of the three provided case studies. Analyze the patient information.
  • Consider a differential diagnosis for the patient in the case study you selected. Think about the most likely diagnosis for the patient.
  • Think about a treatment and management plan for the patient. Be sure to consider appropriate dosages for any recommended pharmacologic and/or non-pharmacologic treatments.
  • Consider strategies for educating patients and families on the treatment and management of the musculoskeletal or neurologic disorder.

By Day 3

Post an explanation of the differential diagnosis for the patient in the case study you selected. Explain which is the most likely diagnosis for the patient and why. Include an explanation of unique characteristics of the disorder you identified as the primary diagnosis. Then, explain a treatment and management plan for the patient, including appropriate dosages for any recommended treatments. Finally, explain strategies for educating patients and families on the treatment and management of the musculoskeletal or neurologic disorder.

Case Study 1:

Clay is a 7-year-old male who presents in your office with complaints of right thigh pain and a limp. The pain began approximately 1 week ago and has progressively worsened. There is no history of trauma. Physical examination is negative except for pain with flexion and internal rotation of the right hip and limited abduction of the right hip. Limb lengths are equal.

Case Study 2:

Trevon is an 18-month-old with a 3-day history of upper-respiratory-type symptoms that have progressively worsened over the last 8 hours. His immunizations are up to date. Mom states he spiked a fever to 103.2°F this morning and he has become increasingly fussy. He vomited after drinking a cup of juice this afternoon and has refused PO fluids since then. Pertinent physical exam findings include negative abdominal exam, marked irritability with inconsolable crying, and he cries louder with pupil examination and fights head and neck assessment. You are unable to elicit Kernig’s or Brudzinski’s signs due to patient noncompliance.

Case Study 3:

Molly is a 12-year-old who comes to your office after hitting her head on the ground during a soccer game. Her mother reports that she did not lose consciousness, but that she seems “loopy” and doesn’t remember what happened immediately following her fall. She was injured when she collided with another player and fell backward, striking her head on the ground. She has no vomiting and denies diplopia but complains of significant headache. Physical examination is negative except for the presence of slight nystagmus. All other neurologic findings including fundoscopic examination are normal.

 

 

Read a selection of your colleagues’ responses.

 

"Looking for a Similar Assignment? Get Expert Help at an Amazing Discount!"

Comments are closed.

Loading...
error: Content is protected !!
WhatsApp Chat with us on WhatsApp